Archive for August, 2009

New Business Services: Youtube Video Production and Video Marketing

Sunday, August 30th, 2009

Youtube Video Promotion Special:

If you simply need an animated presentation putting together images you have with titles without having to add any footage we shoot

Basic Package: $97: Basic animation, editing, titles, sound, slideshows and basic effects, 5 minutes max

Production Package: $297 Standard animation, sourcing of footage and editing of your footage, titles, sound + voice over, effects 8 minutes max

Project Package: $497 – this involves more detailed animation, titles, detailed sourcing and editing of footage, detailed effects – I can also present your video if you need me to write and/or delvier a script presenting information on your business or products, 10 minutes max

Email: kurbpromo@gmail.com

Recently I have been reinspired to get my online business pumping again.

Firstly reading about cheap and simple services dominating because they can perform the task most of the time  without all the added complexity and expense of other products and services that were essentially developed for an era of far more technological restraint then what we are experiencing now.

They give the example of the mp3 – how it changed the music industry when it was discovered people would rather have a convenient format then a high quality format and that we have quickly accepted the mp3 as the new – albeit lower – standard.

From my music marketing to my cd and dvd duplication business I have followed the same strategy. Providing the most I could at the lowest possible price.

I never claim that I’m the best or that what I offer is better quality, but I always claim that it’s better value. Dollar for dollar what you get from me and my business is more than the competitors.

My service is better than the lowest and my price is better than the highest.

This has really motivated me in my business because I’m aware that I am well adapted for these conditions and that there is a number of opportunities that I have been fairly blase about.

The blog promotion, nah I dunno, too much messing around – too low value, not enough profit on each sale. If I had one individual to manage it, then we could look at it, but honestly it’s just sitting there getting authority so there’s no need to panic.

My idea of colour copying and colour printing services continues to have a lot more traction due to the demand, but again the low margin value means

Video is where it’s at.

Cheap Video Production – I’ve got my video guys already shooting footage, collecting pictures and designing animated titles, effects, cuts – cheap video editing – they’re editing video footage I’ve provided and finally we have the cheap video marketing that capsit off guaranteeing increased youtube views through youtube video marketing campaigns.

So the employees are there and ready to work, and provide a high value product working in an exciting medium.

And just right then rigth now I added a new design to the three pages, so it’s worth checking out the video services available!

Auckland Promotions and Marketing Services: Cheap and Simple is Fine

Sunday, August 30th, 2009


Kurb is an Auckland based promotions and internet marketing providing services that are affordable and comprehensive.

video marketing

Music marketing

Printing

Disc Duplication

This article has been reproduced from wired for reference.


In 2001, Jonathan Kaplan and Ariel Braunstein noticed a quirk in the camera market. All the growth was in expensive digital cameras, but the best-selling units by far were still cheap, disposable film models. That year, a whopping 181 million disposables were sold in the US, compared with around 7 million digital cameras. Spotting an opportunity, Kaplan and Braunstein formed a company called Pure Digital Technologies and set out to see if they could mix the rich chocolate of digital imaging with the mass-market peanut butter of throwaway point-and-shoots. They called their brainchild the Single Use Digital Camera and cobranded it with retailers, mostly pharmacies like CVS.

The concept looked promising, but it turned out to be fatally flawed. The problem, says Simon Fleming-Wood, a member of Pure Digital’s founding management team, was that the business model relied on people returning the $20 cameras to stores in order to get prints and a CD. The retailers were supposed to send the used boxes back to Pure Digital, which would refurbish them, reducing the number of new units it had to manufacture. But customers didn’t return the cameras fast enough. Some were content to view their pictures on the tiny 1.4-inch LCD and held on to the device, thinking they’d take it in later to get prints. Others figured out how to hack the camera so it would download to a PC, eliminating the need to return the thing altogether.

Brisk sales combined with a lack of speedy returns destroyed the company’s thin margins, and the camera failed. But the experience taught Kaplan and Braunstein a lesson: Customers would sacrifice lots of quality for a cheap, convenient device. To keep the price down, Pure Digital had made significant trade-offs. It used inexpensive lenses and other components and limited the number of image-processing chips. The pictures were OK but not great. Yet Pure Digital sold 3 million cameras anyway.

Kaplan and Braunstein also learned something important about camera retailing in general. The market had long been split into two main segments: point-and-shoots (including disposables) and single-lens reflex cameras, which use interchangeable lenses and other high-end accessories. Not surprisingly, the vast majority of cameras sold then—as now—were the handy point-and-shoots; SLRs tended to attract only serious hobbyists and professionals.

Oddly, though, there was no point-and-shoot analogue in video cameras—and that’s where the pair saw their next opportunity. Home videocams were almost without exception expensive, complicated devices loaded with features like image stabilization, night-vision mode, and onboard color correction. And even with tools like Apple’s iMovie, it was a hassle to get footage off the cameras and onto a computer for editing and sharing. In terms of complexity and price, the camcorder market resembled the SLR market, but with no low-end alternative. Kaplan and Braunstein suspected that there might be a place for a much cheaper, simpler video camera. So they decided to make one.

After some trial and error, Pure Digital released what it called the Flip Ultra in 2007. The stripped-down camcorder—like the Single Use Digital Camera—had lots of downsides. It captured relatively low-quality 640 x 480 footage at a time when Sony, Panasonic, and Canon were launching camcorders capable of recording in 1080 hi-def. It had a minuscule viewing screen, no color-adjustment features, and only the most rudimentary controls. It didn’t even have an optical zoom. But it was small (slightly bigger than a pack of smokes), inexpensive ($150, compared with $800 for a midpriced Sony), and so simple to operate—from recording to uploading—that pretty much anyone could figure it out in roughly 6.7 seconds.

Within a few months, Pure Digital could barely keep up with orders. Customers found that the Flip was the perfect way to get homebrew videos onto the suddenly flourishing YouTube, and the camera became a megahit, selling more than 1 million units in its first year. Today—just two years later—the Flip Ultra and its subsequent revisions are the best-selling video cameras in the US, commanding 17 percent of the camcorder market. Sony and Canon are now scrambling to catch up.

The Flip’s success stunned the industry, but it shouldn’t have. It’s just the latest triumph of what might be called Good Enough tech. Cheap, fast, simple tools are suddenly everywhere. We get our breaking news from blogs, we make spotty long-distance calls on Skype, we watch video on small computer screens rather than TVs, and more and more of us are carrying around dinky, low-power netbook computers that are just good enough to meet our surfing and emailing needs. The low end has never been riding higher.

So what happened? Well, in short, technology happened. The world has sped up, become more connected and a whole lot busier. As a result, what consumers want from the products and services they buy is fundamentally changing. We now favor flexibility over high fidelity, convenience over features, quick and dirty over slow and polished. Having it here and now is more important than having it perfect. These changes run so deep and wide, they’re actually altering what we mean when we describe a product as “high-quality.”

And it’s happening everywhere. As more sectors connect to the digital world, from medicine to the military, they too are seeing the rise of Good Enough tools like the Flip. Suddenly what seemed perfect is anything but, and products that appear mediocre at first glance are often the perfect fit.

The good news is that this trend is ideally suited to the times. As the worst recession in 75 years rolls on, it’s the light and nimble products that are having all the impact—exactly the type of thing that lean startups and small-scale enterprises are best at. And from impact can come big sales. “When the economy went south before Christmas last year, we worried that sales would be affected,” says Pure Digital’s Fleming-Wood. “But we sold a ton of cameras. In fact, we exceeded the goals we had set before the economy soured.” And this year? Sales, he says, are up 200 percent. (Another payoff: In May, networking giant Cisco acquired Pure Digital for $590 million.)

To some, it looks like the crapification of everything. But it’s really an improvement. And businesses need to get used to it, because the Good Enough revolution has only just begun.

Speaking at an Online publishers conference in London last October, New York University new-media studies professor Clay Shirky had a mantra to offer the assembled producers and editors: “Don’t believe the myth of quality.” When it comes to the future of media on the Web, Shirky sternly warned, resist the reflex to focus on high production values. “We’re getting to the point where the Internet can support high-quality content, and it’s as if what we’ve had so far has all been nice—a kind of placeholder—but now the professionals are coming,” Shirky said. “That’s not true.” To reinforce his point, he pointed to the MP3. The music industry initially laughed off the format, he explained, because compared with the CD it sounded terrible. What record labels and retailers failed to recognize was that although MP3 provided relatively low audio quality, it had a number of offsetting positive qualities.

Shirky’s point is crucial. By reducing the size of audio files, MP3s allowed us to get music into our computers—and, more important, onto the Internet—at a manageable size. This in turn let us listen to, manage, and manipulate tracks on our PCs, carry thousands of songs in our pockets, purchase songs from our living rooms, and share tracks with friends and even strangers. And as it turned out, those benefits actually mattered a lot more to music lovers than the single measure of quality we had previously applied to recorded music—fidelity. It wasn’t long before record labels were wringing their hands over declining CD sales.

“There comes a point at which improving upon the thing that was important in the past is a bad move,” Shirky said in a recent interview. “It’s actually feeding competitive advantage to outsiders by not recognizing the value of other qualit ies.” In other words, companies that focus on traditional measures of quality—fidelity, resolution, features—can become myopic and fail to address other, now essential attributes like convenience and shareability. And that means someone else can come along and drink their milk shake.

To a degree, the MP3 follows the classic pattern of a disruptive technology, as outlined by Clayton Christensen in his 1997 book The Innovator’s Dilemma. Disruptive technologies, Christensen explains, often enter at the bottom of the market, where they are ignored by established players. These technologies then grow in power and sophistication to the point where they eclipse the old systems.

That is certainly part of what happens with Good Enough tech: MP3s entered at the bottom of the market, were ignored, and then turned the music business upside down. But oddly, audio quality never really readjusted upward. Sure, software engineers have cooked up new encoding algorithms that produce fuller sound without drastically increasing file sizes. And with recent increases in bandwidth and the advent of giant hard drives, it’s now even possible to maintain, share, and carry vast libraries of uncompressed files. But better-sounding options have hardly gained any ground on the lo-fi MP3. The big advance—the one that had all the impact—was the move to easier-to-manage bits. Compared with that, improved sound quality just doesn’t move the needle.

Of course, there are those who appreciate the richer sound of uncompressed files, CDs, or even vinyl records (regarded by some audiophiles as the highest-fi format available). But most of us don’t give it a second thought. In fact, there’s evidence that consumers are simply adapting to the MP3’s thin sound. Jonathan Berger, a professor of music at Stanford University, recently completed a six-year study of his students. Every year he asked new arrivals in his class to listen to the same musical excerpts played in a variety of digital formats—from standard MP3s to high-fidelity uncompressed files—and rate their preferences. Every year, he reports, more and more students preferred the sound of MP3s, particularly for rock music. They’ve grown accustomed to what Berger calls the percussive sizzle—aka distortion—found in compressed music. To them, that’s what music is supposed to sound like.

What has happened with the MP3 format and other Good Enough technologies is that the qualities we value have simply changed. And the change is so profound that the old measures have almost lost their meaning. Call it the MP3 effect.

We’ve seen it again and again. Consider, for example, the rise of cloud computing. For years, software was something you bought and installed on your hard drive. A lot of it was made by Microsoft, which solidified its dominance by releasing ever more powerful, feature-laden updates. But with the advent of services like Gmail and Zoho Writer, many users are now turning to the Web for basic tasks like word processing, spreadsheets, and email. These cloud apps have inherent limits: They run through a browser window and can’t directly access your local hard drive or processor. They lack features. Their performance depends on the strength of your Internet connection. Nevertheless, tens of millions of people use Gmail, while Zoho Writer boasts 1.8 million users and is growing at a rate of 100,000 subscribers a month. Microsoft, of course, is now jumping into the cloud as fast as it can. Redmond says that Office 2010 will be largely cloud-based. Not to be outdone, Google recently announced a mostly cloud-based operating system that will work in tandem with the company’s Chrome browser.

Web tools are succeeding because they’re Good Enough. They do most of what we need from a word processor or a spreadsheet or an email program or even an OS. But, like the MP3, they also offer other advantages. You can access them from any computer. If your hard drive crashes, you don’t lose your work. And they are incredibly cheap—free in the case of simple tools or just a few dollars a month per user in the case of business apps.

Compare these qualities with those of the MP3 and the Flip, and a clear pattern emerges. The attributes that now matter most all fall under the rubric of accessibility. Thanks to the speed and connectivity of the digital age, we’ve stopped fussing over pixel counts, sample rates, and feature lists. Instead, we’re now focused on three things: ease of use, continuous availability, and low price. Is it simple to get what we want out of the technology? Is it available everywhere, all the time—or as close to that ideal as possible? And is it so cheap that we don’t have to think about price? Products that benefit from the MP3 effect capitalize on one or more of these qualities. And they’ll happily sacrifice power and features to do so.

By traditional military standards, the MQ-1 Predator isn’t much of a plane. Its top speed is a mere 135 miles per hour. It has an altitude ceiling of 25,000 feet. It carries only two 100-pound Hellfire missiles. It has a propeller. By comparison, an A-10 can travel 420 mph, cruise at 45,000 feet, and carry up to 16,000 pounds of bombs—not to mention a 30-mm gatling gun. An F-16 can reach a blistering 1,500 mph (Mach 2), climb to more than 50,000 feet, and back up its 20-mm multibarrel canon with six missiles.

All three of these aircraft are used for surveillance and close air support. But more and more, the military is relying on the unmanned Predator. In the past two years, it has logged more than 250,000 flight hours, nearly all of them in combat. It has been deployed to the Balkans, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Iraq.

Why, if manned planes are so superior, is the Predator saturating the combat market? Because military aircraft are experiencing their own version of the MP3 effect.

Over the past few decades, the armed services—like many industries—have been radically changed by the Internet and other modern communications technologies. Now that the military can digitize and share information quickly, engagements are conducted differently: Greater emphasis is being put on “situational awareness,” the ability of remote commanders to know what’s happening on a battlefield at all times. This in turn has altered what the military looks for in a plane, much the same way small digital files changed what music fans value in a recording.

There is at least one measure by which the Predator has piloted aircraft handily beat: the ability to maintain a constant presence in the air. That’s because the drones are relatively cheap to build, can fly for more than 20 hours straight, and don’t require pilots who need sleep, food, and bathroom breaks (and who might die if the plane is shot down). In Afghanistan and Iraq, a Predator is available pretty much anytime the military needs one. Accessibility, in other words, has become a dominant aircraft value—prized as much as, and sometimes more than, speed, altitude, and armament.

“Sustaining the sorts of operations we conduct with the Predator used to be virtually impossible,” says Eric Mathewson, director of the Air Force Unmanned Aircraft Systems Task Force. “The idea of putting an aircraft over an area of interest 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, was simply unsustainable.”

Piloted aircraft are still valuable, he’s quick to add, but because the Predator can linger, it has enabled a new type of strategy—remotely guided surgical strikes with fewer troops and armaments. It’s a lesson that surprised the Air Force and other services, Mathewson says, but one that has been learned definitively. “We’re now looking at aircraft capabilities for the future that are even more persistent,” he says. “We’re exploring airships again, which could stay airborne for up to five years.”

The impact of the Predator illustrates the potential of the MP3 effect to transform almost any market. In fact, Good Enough tech is already gaining a foothold in two other huge industries: the legal profession and health care.

Richard Granat is a pioneer in a field called elawyering. It shouldn’t be confused with Web sites that merely offer legal documents for downloading, Granat explains. Elawyering involves actual lawyers, and clients who use these services get help sorting through legal issues.

Granat, who runs his own law firm and cochairs the American Bar Association’s task force on elawyering, has designed and marketed a number of Web tools that walk people through common legal procedures. He created a child-support calculator, for example, which assists couples going through relatively amicable divorces. There’s also a tool to help people decide whether they need Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. These widgets then generate legal forms, which may be reviewed by a licensed attorney who can make suggestions or offer advice over the phone.

It turns out to be a remarkably efficient way of offering what Granat calls legal transaction services—tasks that are document intensive. For everything from wills to adoptions to shareholder agreements, elawyering has numerous advantages. It’s cheaper, for example; a no-fault divorce, Granat says, might run a fifth of what seeing an attorney would cost. It’s also faster—customers can access the tools anytime and never have to interrupt their day to meet with someone in a distant office. Simply put, elawyering makes certain legal services more accessible.

There are trade-offs, of course. “The relationship has less richness than what you’d get from sitting in a lawyer’s office,” Granat says. “And if you have an issue that’s more complex, then you still need to see a lawyer face-to-face.” In other words, it’s a lower-fidelity experience.

But for most simple legal interactions, elawyering is, well, Good Enough. It gets the job done, even if it doesn’t let you ask every question or address every contingency. And not surprisingly, it’s on the rise. “Elawyering will be mainstream in three years,” Granat says. “I predict that in five years, if you’re a small firm and don’t offer this kind of Web service, you’re not going to make it.”

In the case of health care, the Good Enough mindset can be seen in a new initiative by Kaiser Permanente. The largest not-for-profit medical organization in the country, Kaiser has long relied on a simple strategy of building complete, self-sustaining hospitals—employing 50 doctors or more—in each region it serves. “It’s an efficient model,” says Michele Flanagin, Kaiser’s vice president of delivery systems strategy. “It offers one-stop shopping: pharmacy and radiology and everything you want from health care in one building.” But that approach forces patients who don’t live near a hospital to drive a long way for even the most routine doctor’s appointment.

As it happens, though, Kaiser has become one of the most technologically advanced health care providers in the country, digitizing everything from patient records and doctors’ notes to lab data and prescriptions and putting it all online. The system is networked, so patients can email their doctor, check lab results, and make appointments from their PC or mobile Web device. Getting a referral doesn’t mean carrying medical records from one doctor to another, as it does at many hospitals.

In 2007, Flanagin and her colleagues wondered what would happen if, instead of building a hospital in a new area, Kaiser just leased space in a strip mall, set up a high tech office, and hired two doctors to staff it. Thanks to the digitization of records, patients could go to this “microclinic” for most of their needs and seamlessly transition to a hospital farther away when necessary. So Flanagin and her team began a series of trials to see what such an office could do. They cut everything they could out of the clinics: no pharmacy, no radiology. They even explored cutting the receptionist in favor of an ATM-like kiosk where patients would check in with their Kaiser card.

What they found is that the system performed very well. Two doctors working out of a microclinic could meet 80 percent of a typical patient’s needs. With a hi-def video conferencing add-on, members could even link to a nearby hospital for a quick consult with a specialist. Patients would still need to travel to a full-size facility for major trauma, surgery, or access to expensive diagnostic equipment, but those are situations that arise infrequently.

If that 80 percent number rings a bell, it’s because of the famous Pareto principle, also known as the 80/20 rule. And it happens to be a recurring theme in Good Enough products. You can think of it this way: 20 percent of the effort, features, or investment often delivers 80 percent of the value to consumers. That means you can drastically simplify a product or service in order to make it more accessible and still keep 80 percent of what users want—making it Good Enough—which is exactly what Kaiser did.

Flanagin believes these clinics will enable Kaiser to add thousands of new members. And they’ll do it for less. The per-member cost at a microclinic is roughly half that of a full Kaiser hospital. The first microclinic is set to open in Hawaii early next year. Medical care is now poised for its own manifestation of the MP3 effect.

The phenomenon certainly won’t stop with hospitals, lawyers, and military campaigns. As more and more industries move their business online, they too will find success in Good Enough tools that focus on maximizing accessibility. It’s a reflection of our new value system. We’ve changed. To benefit from the MP3 effect, companies will have to change as well.

No one understands this better than the folks at Pure Digital Technologies. Two years ago, the Flip Ultra nailed all three of those accessibility traits: It was significantly less expensive than other digital video cameras—so much so, it almost seemed an impulse buy in comparison. It was much easier to use, not only for shooting video but also for uploading clips to the Internet. And its pocketable size and Web-sharing abilities made video available anytime, anywhere. The Flip hit the Good Enough trifecta.

When asked why he thinks the Flip has succeeded where more powerful videocams—and even new Flip knockoffs from the likes of Sony—have failed, Pure Digital’s Fleming-Wood has an interesting answer: “I think it’s because we have a better product.” What’s odd is that executives at Sony and Canon would likely say the same thing—after all, their models have far more features and often produce sharper images. But Fleming-Wood is using a different definition of “better.” He now defines quality entirely in terms of ease of use—how easy it is to shoot and share the video. “The one thing everyone wants to do with their footage is show it to someone else,” he says.

Even so, it’s easy to imagine that feature creep will one day seep into the Flip. After all, the company recently released models that record in HD, so why not image stabilization or a bigger LCD—or hey, how about a touchscreen! “We will always prioritize accessibility over features,” Fleming-Wood insists. The increase in pixel count, he says, is simply the result of Moore’s law advances in chip speed and storage capacity, not a signal that Pure Digital is changing its focus. Once HD components became available that would not drastically raise the price of the camera or make it harder to use, “it made no sense not to go HD,” Fleming-Wood says. He points out that Pure Digital has yet to include other features like an optical zoom or image stabilization, adding that he knows people love the Flip because of how simple it makes recording and sharing video. “We will never sacrifice that.”

When he thinks about how the Flip line will improve in the future, Fleming-Wood envisions adding features that will make the video even easier to share. “Well, we could add Wi-Fi or cell connectivity, so if you were filming your kid’s soccer game, you could be uploading the footage to the Web in real time so Grandma could watch from home,” he says with a daydreamer’s enthusiasm. To do something that ambitious, of course, might require sacrificing some of that HD image quality. No problem, as long as it’s Good Enough.

Kurb Promotions Music Marketing Services Available

Saturday, August 29th, 2009

Need seriously professional online music business support?

My name is Matt Turner and my company Kurb specializes in online music business – marketing, management, strategy and business models for artists and organisations.

We do websites, design, online advertising, video promotion and production, email management, brand strategy, content marketing, administration . . . everything basically.

We tailor online solutions that are comprehensive and affordable. I run a team of staff in the Philippines, India, Bangladesh and here in New Zealand which offers insurmountable value in online music marketing to musicians in the US or Europe.

Our fees start at US$200 p/month which gets you 4 hours from me building your online marketing and branding strategy and 10 hours from our support team in design, social media, video, and content.

You simply won’t get this standard of service and expertise at this price elsewhere.

Contact me, Matt: kurbpromo@gmail.com

we are used to working with individual clients 1-on-1, but the service we offer involves me discussing what those clients need specifically for their campaigns.

Our standard package involves a 3 month campaign costing $US600 and that pays for 12 hours from me and 30 hours from my support staff over 3 months. It is in that time that I consult with the artist, agree on a number of priority services the artist will need and then execute.

Because we like to provide a service that is responsive to the needs of the artists, that’s why we commonly charge in such units of $200 for a months work that represents 4 hours form me and 10 hours from my staff each month.

Individual services that make up our campaigns consist of

Website + Blog set up + design: $US300
Covers website design, set up, blog, hosting + domain name for one year.

Myspace Promotion: $US100 p/month
This covers 3000 actions per month – friend requests, comments etc.

Youtube Promotion: US$500
This package Guarantees 25k+ views and also includes free “Basic Video Production”

Video Production Basic: $US100 // 1 day project
Supply your footage/images/mp3 and titles for your basic online video

Video Production Advanced: $400 // 5 day project
Supply your footage/images/mp3 and titles for your online music video
We can also shoot video as requested, also comes with 10k+ youtube views free

Website Promotion Package: $400
This involves an ad campaigns on Google and Facebook that guarantees over 100,000+ impressions and 5,000+ highly targeted and qualified visitors to your artist site. This also includes a Search Engine Optimisation campaign to get your site to the first page on google for a number of relevant search terms.

Artist Branding package: $200 p/month
This combines Myspace, Facebook and Twitter marketing with blogging, managing artist profiles, distributing content and developing viral and interactive fan management strategies – this is more oriented to managing social media promotion then actual marketing and promotion.

That’s a basic run down of most of the key services we provide. With the ongoing online music marketing service we often provide a lot more, however this group covers most of the significant services we offer.

we aim to provide a comprehensive online marketing and
management service for artists, which often means we help artists to
evaluate which strategies are going to be appropriate for them.

Immediately I’m recognising:

– You need an official website which will allow you to sign up fans to
an email list and interact with them regularly there, we provide
websites as well as email list management, and google website
promotion

– you want to promote your youtube. Our service can get you 10,000’s
more views on your videos as well as more subscribers and attention

– the 2 most effective techniques we are using right now are online
advertising and article marketing. From this technique we are taking
artist to being able to sign up new fans every day to their list
within 6 weeks.

– we have 3 video staff available who can edit and produce video
footage and video for youtube editing together video, sound, pictures
and titles with effects.

All this and more is covered by just $400 upfront payment. If you’re
happy with the service you receive you can pay a 2nd installment of
$200 to continue our promotion, if not, you receive all designs,
campaign data, and videos and are under no obligation to pay.

101 Small Business Quotes from Bloggers

Thursday, August 27th, 2009

On the Small Business Advantage

1. “Respond. This is the single biggest advantage you have over the big guys. Not only are you in charge, you also answer the phone and read your email and man the desk and set the prices. So, don’t pretend you have a policy. Just be human.”
— Seth Godin, Seth’s Blog

2. “As a small business owner, you have the advantages of speed and flexibility. Use them to your advantage. Like Wayne Gretzky, skate to where the puck is GOING to be, and chances are that you’ll get there faster than your larger, more bureaucratic competitors.”
— Chuck Frey, Innovation Tools

3. “Show your passion for helping your customers solve problems – and talk to them like you talk to your friends. A real, enthusiastic, human voice is every small business’s edge”
— Andy Wibbels, AndyWibbels.com

4. “One simple social business policy might be: Be invested. Be human. Be helpful as if the whole company depends on what you say and do, because customer service is the advantage of small business brands.”
— Liz Strauss, Successful Blog

5. “Smaller scale businesses should take advantage of how easy it can be to maintain closer, more intimate ties with their now very values-based end consumers (who have high expectations about brand interaction).”
— Andrea Learned, Learned on Women

On Motivation, Persistence, and Resiliency

6. “Outlast the competition. I was amazed at all the empty storefronts I saw in LA on my last visit. On one particular block, three or four of the ten lunch places were shut down. And the others? Doing great. That’s because the remaining office workers who used to eat lunch at the shuttered places had to eat somewhere, and so the survivors watched their business grow. A war of attrition is never pretty, but if you’re smart about overhead and scale, you’ll win it.”
— Seth Godin, Seth’s Blog

7. “Don’t give up. Most people who are self-employed went through a time when they had no money. And they worried they would lose everything they own, and their career. And they kept going. The people who succeed are people who refuse to quit. If you keep trying to make money from your business, you will eventually succeed so that you don’t starve. Really. Just don’t quit.”
— Penelope Trunk, Penelope Trunk’s Brazen Careerist

8. “Count up your successes regularly. One person I know put a marble in a fishbowl each time she got a compliment or a bit of good press for her business or a nice note from a customer or a big order. Then every time she looked at the fishbowl she was reminded of all the good things in her business. Her employees could see it, too. This is invaluable on days when everything seems to go wrong. It keeps self-doubt from building up – and tearing you down. It also helps employees feel good.”
— Anita Campbell, Small Business Trends

9. “If you find yourself in a rut, try thinking back on the reasons you initially wanted to start your own business and don’t lose sight of them. If you need to, write them down.”
— Megan Dorn, The Startup Blog

10. “If you do not enjoy what you are doing, try something else.”
— Anthony Cerminaro, BizzBangBuzz

11. “Do not be afraid of hard work, learn to multi-task, be flexible and patient.”
— Harish Keshwani, BusinessWorks, Inc.

On Starting Up

12. “Don’t start a company unless it’s an obsession and something you love.”
— Mark Cuban, Blog Maverick

13. “Be careful about trusting intuition, but be more careful not to bend to the majority for whom ‘impossible’ is a comforting excuse for inaction.”
— Tim Ferriss, The Blog of Tim Ferriss

14. “When starting and growing your business, it’s important to bootstrap with your own resources as much as possible.”
— Mike Smith, Guerrilla Freelancing

15. “Don’t be afraid to skip a step. The people I consider the most successful (by my definition which includes enjoying their work, earning a good living, feeling happy and accomplishing lots of life goals) do not wait for permission from anyone to pursue opportunities.”
— Pamela Slim, Escape from Cubicle Nation

On Financial Management

16. “Become a cash flow king. Manage cash flow like there is no tomorrow. Know which vendors can wait and who needs to be paid right away. Always have some money on hand for emergencies and only borrow if you know when you can pay it back.”
— Jared Reitzin, Mobile Marketing Watch

17. “Jump on every opportunity to eliminate needless costs, but never stop investing in the long-term future of your business—no matter what is happening in the market.”
— Michael McLaughlin, Guerrilla Consulting

On Business Planning

18. “If you don’t enjoy planning your business’ future, you must be doing it wrong; ease up on the business plan document, do just the planning, just big enough to run your business and control your own destiny. ”
— Tim Berry, Up and Running, Entrepreneur.com

19. “Measure EVERYTHING in your business that you care about and use your findings to drive your decisions so they are based on facts, rather than emotions or seat of the pants guesswork.”
— Mark Riffey, Rescue Marketing

20. “Define your goals – Be clear on what you want. Do you want 20 more leads in your database? Do you want to generate $995K in net new customer in revenue this year? Do you want to add 15 new clients this quarter?”
— Jared Reitzin, Mobile Marketing Watch

21. “Carefully plan for achievement. Achievement is like building a home. It must be pre-planned, budgeted for, executed with daily hands-on management, have managed solutions (contingency plans), and be ready for situations when other ways to achieve the end result must be applied within a finite time frame.”
— Tom Marquardt, The Profit Repairman

22. “The best way to build a career or a business is to test and try a lot of things. If you spend too much time in the planning stages, opportunities pass you by.”
— Pamela Slim, Escape from Cubicle Nation

23. “Embrace constraints. Constraints and limitations are wonderful allies and lead to enhanced creativity and ingenious solutions that without constraints never would have been discovered or created.”
— Garr Reynolds, Presentation Zen

24. “Overconfidence is a killer. Question your business plan as much as you would question your nephew’s business plan if he were to hit you up for a loan.”
— Alex Tabarrok, Marginal Revolution

25. “This notion of overnight success is an urban legend, and very misleading. If you’re starting something new, expect a long journey. ”
— Martin Zwilling Startup Professionals Musings

26. “Even though you may have considerable experience in the world of business, you should not assume that you can ‘shortcut’ your way to success in your new endeavor. Certainly, your experience in the real world will stand you in good stead in terms of marketing, customer relations and so on, but you must start with your clean sheet of paper each time.”
— Adam Toren, Young Entrepreneur

On Hiring Employees

27. “Hire people who are more talented than you are; your business will never grow if you’re worried about hiring people that will outshine you.”
— Rich Brooks, Flyte Blog

28. “Hire people you trust and train them to use the time in the ways you want them to move business forward for you. Just as you do in other parts of your company.”
— Liz Strauss, Successful Blog

29. “Develop a rich internship program. Interns are a great way to keep the atmosphere fresh and vibrant, but they’re also a great way to transition talented young individuals into your work force. Internship programs also allow you to assess an individual’s skills and work ethic in a real-life setting without any long-term commitments.”
— Megan Dorn, The Startup Blog

On Managing Employees

30. “I recommend working collaboratively with people throughout the organization. Ask each individual to identify something in his or her daily work that is inconsistent with the organization’s core values. Randomly sort the individuals into groups of three to six and ask each group to come up with the three most significant misalignments pertaining to each core value. This process allows your organization to quickly identify—without pointing fingers—the four or five most significant misalignments.”
— Jim Collins, JimCollins.com

31. “Allow folks to work off hours. Commuting sucks and is a waste of time for everyone. Let folks start at 6am or 11am and you’ll cut their commute in half.”
— Jason Calacanis, Calacanis.com

On Leadership

32. “Leadership is scarce because few people are willing to go through the discomfort required to lead. It’s uncomfortable to stand up in front of strangers. It’s uncomfortable to propose an idea that might fail. It’s uncomfortable to challenge the status quo. It’s uncomfortable to resist the urge to settle. If you’re not uncomfortable in your work as a leader, it’s almost certain you’re not reaching your potential as a leader.”
— Seth Godin, Seth’s Blog

On Innovation

33. “Continuously experiment, improvise and try new things that improve your business and add customer value.”
— Steve King, Small Business Labs

34. “Don’t underestimate the importance of capturing your ideas – they’re the lifeblood of your business.”
— Chuck Frey, Innovation Tools

On Your Product

35. “Best beats first. It doesn’t really matter who gets there first, so long as you figure out a way to produce a better solution, doggedly persist in bringing that solution to the world, and continually improve.”
— Jim Collins, JimCollins.com

36. “Understand companies that understand user-interface design. Study the best: Google, Apple, Lexus, and Ferrari. They understand that complexity is their best friend, not an enemy. They understand it, so they can exploit it.”
— Matthew May, In Pursuit of Elegance

37. “Keep feature creep in check. The one constant source of elegant innovation is observation. The Japanese call it genchi genbutsu which means ‘go look, go see.’ That allows you to triangulate around the customer: observe them not just by asking them what they want—they don’t always know, can’t always articulate it, and they’ll change their mind tomorrow—but by becoming one yourself.”
— Matthew May, In Pursuit of Elegance

On Marketing

38. “Good word of mouth is the best marketing money can’t buy.”
— Muhammad Saleem, MuhammadSaleem.com

39. “NEVER EVER EVER hire a PR firm. A PR firm will call or email people in the publications, shows and websites you already watch, listen to and read. Those people publish their emails. Whenever you consume any information related to your field, get the email of the person publishing it and send them an email introducing yourself and the company. Their job is to find new stuff. They will welcome hearing from the founder instead of some PR flack. Once you establish communications with that person, make yourself available to answer their questions about the industry and be a source for them. If you are smart, they will use you.”
— Mark Cuban, Blog Maverick

40. “The key is finding the advertising channel that best fits your company and your industry and use it to get the biggest bang for your buck. At the end of the day, it’s not about how much you spend or how many eyeballs you reach. It’s about how many customers you can bring in the door while still making enough money to float your boat.”
— Rosalind Resnick, Entrepreneur.com

41. “Really think about if you need that $15,000 a month PR firm. Perhaps you can get a PR consultant to work on 2-3 projects a year for $10-15k each and save 75%. More PR firms are wasted half the year while you build up your product anyway.”
— Jason Calacanis, Calacanis.com

42. “Focus on generating attention. The Web has liberated us from the tyranny of paying for attention! Small business entrepreneurs can generate attention for their business in four main ways: You can BUY attention (this is called advertising); you can BEG for attention (this is called Public Relations); you can BUG people one at a time to get attention (this is called sales) or you can EARN attention online by creating great information that your buyers want to consume such as YouTube videos, blogs, Twitter feeds, photographs, charts, graphs, and ebooks—and it is all free. How are YOU generating attention?”
— David Meerman Scott, Web Ink Now

43. “Budget enough time and money to market your company; the world won’t beat a path to your doorstep if they can’t find you on Google.”
— Rich Brooks, Flyte Blog

On Brand Management

44. “Forget touchpoints, conversation, or the other detritus of brandingbabble, and focus on doing things — actions your business takes, and your customers take in response — as thereby you’ll create and nurture the real value of your brand. Follow the previous point unequivocally and without pause. Unless something furthers this pursuit, consider it to be noise.”
— Jonathan Salem Baskin, Dim Bulb

45. “Differentiate Yourself: Create a grid analyzing your business and your competitors. What do you all do similarly? What is the one thing you do that your competitors don’t? Focus on this one thing with your customers for an edge.”
— Kevin Dougan, Strategic Public Relations

46. “Be Consistent: You’ve spent a lot of money on your name, website and logo. Are you using them consistently across your web site, business cards, signage and even in your invoices/receipts? Take a 360 degree view of your business from your customers eyes and make sure you’re hard-earned identity is served up consistently.”
— Kevin Dougan, Strategic Public Relations

On Search Marketing

47. “Be micro-focused and the search engines will find you.”
— Seth Godin, Seth’s Blog

48. “Don’t put all your eggs in Google’s basket. Defensible traffic is a must. If you rely too heavily on free Google traffic, you risk losing that traffic next time the search algorithm changes.”
— Matt McGee, Small Business Search Marketing

On Social Media Marketing

49. “Ask Why, Not What: It might seem like everyone is on Facebook or using Twitter these days. When the latest marketing fads come into view, don’t ask ‘what’ should I do on sites like this, ask ‘why’ should my business be on these sites. If your customers don’t use these sites, should you?”
— Kevin Dougan, Strategic Public Relations

50. “Find your customers online and where they spend time. Once you’ve researched where your customers spend their time, use those venues to converse and collaborate with them toward shared mutual gain.”
— Steve Rubel, SteveRubel.com

51. “Don’t fear the social media space. Small business do excel in social media, because they understand relationships. Though the Internet is often seen as a place to sell, social media has made it a great space for extending customer relationships. Social media tools also offer great ways to connect with other small business to share ideas, to talk with customers for feedback, to announce special events and to find with new partners to make new innovative offers.”
— Liz Strauss, Successful Blog

52. “To increase the effectiveness of your activities, you need to integrate three basic components – research / intelligence, content development, and measurement. Remember that relationships are key in social media, so you will need to expand your thinking to earned direct and indirect links through good content.”
— Valeria Maltoni, Conversation Agent

53. “To make participation in comments and social media activities count for you, listen first, be aware of the context – are people talking about your industry in general, a competitor, or your company directly? – and look to engage in an honest, open and helpful manner. Drop the buzzwords, and do a gut check by reading your comment as you would read what someone else left on your blog.”
— Valeria Maltoni, Conversation Agent

On Market Positioning

54. “Find a significant unmet need and fill it well.”
— Anthony Cerminaro, BizzBangBuzz

55. “Use design, service or ambiance to differentiate your product in some unique, even if small, manner. No matter how pedestrian or utilitarian the product, make buying it or using it an experience”
— Alex Tabarrok, Marginal Revolution

56. “When aligning yourself against the competition, it always pays to be different and take risks.”
— Mike Smith, Guerrilla Freelancing

57. “Own a niche: The Internet has allowed business to get so niche they can make money around the world with the smallest of audiences. Capitalize on this, start small, own a niche and then expand from there.”
— Jared Reitzin, Mobile Marketing Watch

On Lead Generation

58. “Reanimate your sleepers – It costs far less to reach back out to an existing list of dormant customers than it does to find and sell to new customers. Offer your sleepers something outrageously compelling to get them buying again. Even if you make nothing on the sale that ‘awakens’ them, you’ll likely make up for it in continuity sales.”
— Jonathan Fields, JonathanFields.com

59. “Nurture your leads that aren’t sales ready. Lead nurturing isn’t calling every quarter to ask if they are ready to buy, but to become a trusted advisor and provide relevant information to your prospects. In fact, a recent study of business-to-business buyers shows that sales people who become trusted advisors and understand the needs of economic buyers are 69% more likely to come away with a sale.”
— Brian Carroll, B2B Lead Generation Blog

60. “Use your CRM – Don’t create the biggest database of contacts possible. Instead, seek to create the most relevant database possible that contains the right companies and contacts that influence the buying decision. In the beginning, you won’t have all the data you need. Be patient and you’ll build the opportunity profile over time. See each conversation as an opportunity to build a relationship.”
— Brian Carroll, B2B Lead Generation Blog

61. “Don’t let up. Be consistent. No matter how busy you are make time to do lead generation activities. As you know it doesn’t always stay that way. Try to do at least one lead generation thing every day, even if it is something small, that will help you engage a prospective customer. If you use calling, resolve to make an extra call a day before you leave. If you do networking, strive to meet one more person at an event.”
— Brian Carroll, B2B Lead Generation Blog

On Sales

62. “Boost your sales by focusing on how each customer wants to buy, instead of plugging in some standard sales approach.”
— Michael McLaughlin, Guerrilla Consulting

63. “Talk to your prospects to discover their most pressing needs then direct your efforts to solving those challenges. Always be focused on being seen as a problem-solver, sharing and giving rather than focusing on your own gain.”
— Chris Garrett, ChrisG.com

64. “When you do make a request, frame it in benefits to the prospect. For example instead of ‘join my list’, say ‘get the 10 secrets to … delivered to your email inbox’.”
— Chris Garrett, ChrisG.com

65. “Sell more to existing customers – Create a sleaze-free sales process that upsells and cross sells highly-relevant, value-added products or services to clients in order to bump your average order size by 10-15%.”
— Jonathan Fields, JonathanFields.com

66. “Co-operate with a competitor. Up-sell related products after the initial sale. If your customers would benefit by having both of your products, you might negotiate the opportunity to include your competitor’s product inside your own box, or vice versa.”
— Martin Zwilling Startup Professionals Musings

On Customer Relations

67. “Treat your customers right, even when they’re wrong”
— Muhammad Saleem, MuhammadSaleem.com

68. “Small businesses know that relationships matter. Start asking for ways to connect that go beyond the sale.”
— Chris Brogan, ChrisBrogan.com

69. “Then, if you get them, treat these people special, and not like marks. Give them MORE than the others. Encourage them.”
— Chris Brogan, ChrisBrogan.com

70. “If you value your company’s survival, it is imperative that you educate those who respond on your company’s behalf to bear in mind that people are publicizing their interactions.”
— Rosalind Resnick, Entrepreneur.com

On Networking

71. “Always be polite and cordial, even if you think the entire population of the room/party/event you are at are insipid pond scum not worth the light of day. The irritating, pompous pest with an attitude problem and personal hygiene to rival your average skunk may one day turn out to be your best client, or the one man in town who can provide what you need.”
— Derek Heck, Bootstrapping Blog

72. “Never stop learning and associate with right people.”
— Harish Keshwani, BusinessWorks, Inc.

73. “Find a partner. There is no single type of person who succeeds at running their own business, the most common characteristic is someone who decreases risk where he or she can. People who run their own business are taking a big risk just by doing that — they don’t want any more risk if they don’t have to take it. And the most common way to mitigate risk is to partner with people who have skills that you lack yourself. So the successful small business owners have a wide network so they can more easily find the skill set they need when they need it. First in a partner, and then in future employees.”
— Penelope Trunk, Penelope Trunk’s Brazen Careerist

74. “Be confident in your networking, and always think long-term. Don’t discount someone as a contact because they may not be able to help you out immediately. Don’t run up to people demanding their assistance, either. Networking is a two-way street, and quite often it pays big dividends to be the person offering help, rather than the one asking for it. Make yourself useful to your contacts, start building a relationship, and then take things from there.”
— Derek Heck, Bootstrapping Blog

75. “Create a culture of yes. And by that I mean a support system of possibility thinkers – mentors, peers, a coach – who can help foster your greatness. Sometimes that means they’ll call you out and challenge your ideologies, but they will always, always be cheering you on in a way the evokes your true strengths. And that where the power is.”
— Danielle LaPorte, White Hot Truth

On Blogging and Your Website

76. “Be real when communicating with people on a blog. Don’t try to be someone you’re not. It’s impossible to keep up a facade over time. If you’re serious and more of a deep thinker type, then write that way on your blog. If you’re more of a quick-observation type of communicator, do that. There’s room for all kinds.”
— Anita Campbell, Small Business Trends

77. “Consider what need you’re meeting for those reading your blog. If you’re solving a problem, meeting a need or answering a question that people have – they’ll be likely to not only keep coming back to your blog but will also be more willing to go deeper with you and your business in some way by buying a product or engaging your services. Be useful to someone and they’ll become loyal to you.”
— Darren Rowse, Problogger.net

78. “Realize that your company web site isn’t really yours. It belongs to your customers. They’ll use it more than you. Put the kinds of content, tools, etc., on there that they want; make it easy for them to be your customer.”
— Matt McGee, Small Business Search Marketing

79. “To be effective and efficient with your corporate blog, create an editorial schedule of topics and features that are categorically consistent with keywords you want customers to find you with when searching. Keywords in your categories, post titles and in links between pages will give search engines the information they need to rank blog posts in search engines like Google and Bing. Other blogs will link to your content using those keyword phrases in the title which can send more visitors and increase search rankings even more.”
— Lee Odden, TopRank Blog

80. “Be social with your blog. Not only should small business blogs encourage comments by asking questions at the end of their posts, but they can be social through commenting on other blogs related to the topics that are important to customers. Links from comments on other blogs can introduce new visitors to your blog content. Other social options with a blog include running polls, linking out to other prominent blogs (their blog software will let the know you’ve linked to them) add ‘share this’ buttons to make it easy for readers to save, share and bookmark your content as well as email it others that might find it interesting.”
— Lee Odden, TopRank Blog

81. “Don’t be overly concerned with how many readers you have; pay attention to getting the readers whose attention you most want looking at your blog. Quality trumps quantity in the blogoshpere (although having both doesn’t hurt!)”
— Susie Gardner, Buzz Marketing with Blogs

82. “A successful blogger in any industry knows the appetite their audience has for information and under-delivers just slightly. If you have a blog, keep your readers wanting more, and excited to see your posts!”
— Susie Gardner, Buzz Marketing with Blogs

On the Big Picture

83. “As I get older, I see, more and more, that one of the most common mistakes that small business owners make is confusing business with life; take care of yourself and your people first, and don’t let more important things get lost in the business.”
— Tim Berry, Up and Running, Entrepreneur.com

84. “Stop working in (for) your business as if you are an employee and start working ON your business, as if it is an investment.”
— Mark Riffey, Rescue Marketing

85. “Set aside time to think about how to grow your business. If a business isn’t growing, it’s usually not staying the same size — it’s shrinking.”
— Gregory Galant, Venture Voice

86. “Don’t blindly follow the advice of gurus. What worked for them may not work for you. Make your decisions from first principal and learn from experience.”
— Gregory Galant, Venture Voice

87. “The difference between success and non-success is in an individual’s ability to believe in themselves as their own element of change and the daily commitment of that individual with that knowledge of success to execute those changes. Change gives you the ability to rise above and deliver upon command, therefore leading to more positive outcomes. Embrace change.”
— Tom Marquardt, The Profit Repairman

88. “The recession has created a climate of ‘Entrepreneurial Darwinism’ – only the strongest and best managed businesses will survive. To be successful in this economy entrepreneurs must: 1) constantly evaluate their business model to make sure it keeps its relevance and offers true value to the customer in a highly competitive market, and 2) tighten up their finances by keeping overhead expenses to a minimum, paying off debt, and building cash reserves.”
— Jeff Cornwall, The Entrepreneurial Mind

89. “Bring your individual passion to your new business venture and focus on solving the real — not imagined — needs of your customers. ”
— Dominic Basulto, Endless Innovation

90. “Give things some time to happen and fall in place.”
— Harish Keshwani, BusinessWorks, Inc.

91. “Use sustainable business practices: The fact (not trend) of sustainable business practices is one that smaller businesses can more easily act on and should maintain – in order to serve the women’s market, especially, more effectively.”
— Andrea Learned, Learned on Women

92. “Don’t worry about being ‘the next Google’ or ‘the next lululemon’ – the next great company always appears seemingly out of nowhere and is unique in everything it does.”
— Dominic Basulto, Endless Innovation

On Operations

93. “An idea by itself is almost worthless. It’s how you execute that matters. Focus on execution.”
— Dane Carlson, Business Opportunities Weblog

94. “Once per week, stop putting out fires for an afternoon and run the numbers to ensure you’re placing effort in high-yield areas: What 20% of customers/products/regions are producing 80% of the profit? What are the factors that could account for this? Invest in duplicating your few strong areas instead of fixing all of your weaknesses.”
— Tim Ferriss, The Blog of Tim Ferriss

95. “Decide which areas of your business most need improvement. Then, set aside time every single week to focus on reading, researching, learning and implementing improvements in those areas.”
— Becky McCray, Small Biz Survival

96. “Obsess about ideas not tools. Tools are important and necessary, but they come and go as better tools come along. Obsess instead about ideas. Though most tools are ephemeral, some of your best tools are a simple pencil and sketch pad.”
— Garr Reynolds, Presentation Zen

97. “Do not be tempted to fly off in different directions when you finally start to build momentum. It is important to constrain your enthusiasm and make sure that you are striving to be the best at what you do. Many business owners make the mistake of cutting themselves too thinly in this way and find that their core business may indeed suffer.”
— Adam Toren, Young Entrepreneur

98. “Technology is changing almost all industries and businesses. Understand and follow the technologies that are having the greatest impact on them and take advantage of technology to improve business and competitive position.”
— Steve King, Small Business Labs

99. “Use change and turnover to give you the opportunity to evaluate a situation and quickly correct and realign, thus strengthening the whole organization and it’s future.”
— Tom Marquardt, The Profit Repairman

On Time Management

100. “Say no 80% of the time. ‘No, thank you,’ is the sweet spot of focus, and it’s the most powerful word in an entrepreneur’s vocabulary. You’ll be tested to use it on a daily basis in order to stay in sync with your authenticity and your brand, your true interests, and what matters most. And when you let your instincts override that knowing ‘no’ with a feeble yes, it’s almost guaranteed to end in resentment, legal fees, or burn out.”
— Danielle LaPorte, White Hot Truth

101. “We are all equal in this world to everyone else on just one thing, no matter who we are or what we do: TIME. What we do with those precious moments, makes the difference between success and non-success of those goals and achievements that we want to obtain. Make the most of your resources, especially time.”
— Tom Marquardt, The Profit Repairman

Media / Marketing / Promotions / Online Position in Grey Lynn, Auckland

Sunday, August 23rd, 2009

Again, preparing to try and find an intern / assistant / apprentice type person to train up so drafting out a copy for an online ad . . . kurbpromo@gmail.com

Hi, I am entrepreneur who specializes in online marketing and music management, I run several online businesses and handle up to a dozen music and entertainment clients from NZ and around the world at a time.

Once again, despite staff both here and overseas assisting with the business, I am having to turn down opportunities because I have my own personal priorities.

This of course creates the opportunity to bring on and train an assistant or an apprentice to get involved but the skills and experience needed working alongside clients, in online marketing, and in providing our local services, requires knowledge and understanding of what exactly we provide.

This is why this is a training opportunity rather than an offer of immediate employment which would suit a bright younger person of senior high school or university age who was able to commit at least some time initially to learning the broader nature of what we do.

This is a REAL music management, promotions and online marketing business and no training will substitute for experience in a successful working operation, in a position where you can learn the workings of such a business, and easily progress as there is clearly demand for what we do that we cannot currently meet.

Initially we’ll start you working online in music promotion so you won’t have to come in. I’ll be waiting to be impressed by someone who learns quickly and has an agile understanding of online promotion and dealing with the clients concerns by email.

At that stage, to progress you to a paid position which is what the ultimately is, you will have to come in and begin particpating in the more practical parts of the business.

Customer service is paramount, so your understanding of the full range of services we provide and responding to clients inquiries is vital.

But also we have over half a dozen staff working offshore, I need to train someone to keep these staff members on task in terms of our clients projects and goals, while reporting to me and to clients.

This is the role you’ll move into ultimately if you’re looking for high paid career opportunity. Obviously if within a year or two I could replace myself in managing the business that would be something I could definitely provide a generous salary for and also give you an invaluable skill set for business managament in the future.

But until then:

Deliveries and supply runs would also be included, obviously if you have access to a vehicle for a few hours at a time this would be a massive help.

Because Email is our main form of communication and written content still plays a major part in online marketing, good written skills are important.

Summary of what you’ll need to be considered:

Regular access to the internet

Strong written communication – good marks in English, History, Social Studies etc.

Experience and understanding of photoshop, video

Understanding of online social networks: youtube, myspace, facebook etc.

Access to a vehicle

What’s Going On With Kurb’s Online Promotion Services, Auckland

Wednesday, August 19th, 2009

Alright just delivering another fresh update to the blog.

I am seriously thinking about taking on more staff to cover some of the work we’re doing here at Kurb.

That is, the work we’re doing here in New Zealand.

Most of our core business still revolves around CD and DVD duplication service, Music Marketing services which we offer worldwide, and the various print jobs we’re involved in doing.

Of course there are other Online promotions services we provide, but they are very specific business services that we add on to our marketing services for both musicians and small business marketing. We do those often and I guess we’d be looking for someone who can facilitate and administer the production  and delivery of both the CD duplication and the DVD duplication service.

Another part of course is providing the artwork for both the CD/DVD production and the printing and colour copying services we offer.

The artwork has to be taken from the clients file and check to see if it is consistent with the standard of print quality either for CD printing and DVD printing or colour printing jobs such as printing posters, or printing flyers, before it is sent away for printing.

This also includes the printing of CD and DVD covers and other packaging.

Then once the printing has been completed, it must be picked up and either posted or delivered to the client unless it is CD or DVD packaging that must be compiled.

Sometimes, clients will require graphic design services which is great because we provide cheap graphic design. Someone working here with us would again have to co-ordinate between the graphic designer and the client and provide instructions and delivery online.

Finally, co-ordinating the music marketing services we provide making sure that the campaigns for the music artists we work with are on task and progressing, again co-ordinating workers overseas such as graphic designers, web designers, advertising people, co-ordinating social media etc.

Kurb provides a range of online music services. Check out

Our Music Marketing Blog

For more information, tips and advice on music promotion, management and music marketing online.

Other services we provide are:

Gig Promotion

youtube marketing

music video production

Online Marketing and Services Diary Auckland, New Zealand

Tuesday, August 11th, 2009

Alright time for an update post from me.

I’ve had a lot of extra content added to my blog especially this one so that I can start getting more random and long tail search and it appears to be working. The only concern of course is that the kind of traffic ‘m getting will have obviously become a lot more trashy bur I’m hoping at this stage to start shaping the blog up a bit and raisin g the standard of the posts maybe a little more slightly, and definitely improve the theme design on the blog part of the site to reflect it’s purpose of advertising certain online services we provide or basically, all the core services we offer.

That’s kind of what this blog post is about and that is continuing to solidify strong sales in the most financially robust part of the business.

I’ve got a diverse range of activities that I’m promoting in Auckland including print services, auckland poster services and copying, graphic design, web design, and from there moving into specific online marketing services we provide – ppc adwords management, SEO services, but none of that is really our core product or service.  The margins are either very low or the level of service required is very high so either way it’s hard to create ongoing profitability.

There, you’re talking about our DVD duplication services and now my personal online music marketing services which I offer to musicians and entertainers, this is where I’m experiencing the least friction in my business overall and there fore these are my two specialties.

But I also feel like my ability to deliver these 2 services has reached a limit until I can think about expanding my capacity once again.

There is of course an intemdiary tier of business opportunities I am trying to create in the video niche. The problem there is, and this is with a number of my sites, there’s still an initial effort to get the site up and running before it’s actually going to be valuable in terms of generating regular business.

And my little Garage space also. I’m very committed to the idea of getting something started there.

We’ve also got a little bit of a talent agency that we’re cooking up so whattya know? I’ve got lots of hobbies that I don’t see as being particularly profitable but we still like to promote them, after all promotions is our business.

It’s like this: When things are going well it’s not that smart to make the big commitment of trying to get something else going in case your original good thing comes undone.

I’ve got to continue to keep my cd and dvd duplication and copying service going as well as my music marketing as a priority. Any steps I can make in video or other more personal projects, thats a bonus.

Best Result For Pay Per Click Advertising Search Engine Advertising Internet

Tuesday, August 11th, 2009

Kurb Promotions in Auckland, New Zealand provides affordable, personal
and comprehensive promotion and marketing services.

Our prices are competitive, our service is honest and fair, and our
knowledge of marketing service and strategies both online and here in
Auckland and New Zealand is well established.

Contact: kurbpromo@gmail.com

Here’s what we offer:

Online Marketing

Online marketing services and marketing packages for small business,
entrepreneurs, talent, artists, entertainers, creative people and more

Auckland Printing

Youtube Marketing

Cheap Video Production

Graphic Design

Music Promotion

From New Zealand we offer a level of service with our digital business
that is high quality but not high price. A professional marketing
services company that is still cheap and affordable.

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Best Internet Marketing Strategies – Success Is Yours

Tuesday, August 11th, 2009

Kurb Promotions in Auckland, New Zealand provides affordable, personal
and comprehensive promotion and marketing services.

Our prices are competitive, our service is honest and fair, and our
knowledge of marketing service and strategies both online and here in
Auckland and New Zealand is well established.

Contact: kurbpromo@gmail.com

Here’s what we offer:

Online Marketing

Online marketing services and marketing packages for small business,
entrepreneurs, talent, artists, entertainers, creative people and more

Auckland Printing

Youtube Marketing

Cheap Video Production

Graphic Design

Music Promotion

From New Zealand we offer a level of service with our digital business
that is high quality but not high price. A professional marketing
services company that is still cheap and affordable.

Do you hit a list of words that you like? I used to hit a pretty extensive list. I had lots of words on there, but alas I hit forgotten some of them because I wasn’t intellection most them enough. This is depressing because that list was such a simple little pick me up to maintain. I also likeable that I likeable the words for absolutely no logical reason. For example, the word “fusia” was on there and I’m not even one cardinal proportionality trusty what color that is, but I same the sound. Incidentally, I’m intellection fusia is a burgundy-ish color.

I once was out to eat with a girlfriend named Kit (actually her name was Katrina and for some conceive it was shortened to Kit rather than Kat). The relationship was understandably coming to a close, but we still had a some dinners and drinks in us before the official end. Anyways, that night she told me that she likeable the word “perpendicular” and although I was mentally tainted in my intellection most her, because I knew that we were going to break up, at the moment that she said that, she seemed to me the most bonny woman in the world. I same words and I same people who same words.

Anyways, I meet realized that I also same the word “strategy”. I’m not trusty why. I same it and moreover, meet intellection most it makes me wish I had a strategy…for anything…except marketing. I don’t want a marketing strategy and I definitely don’t want an internet marketing strategy. Much same my feelings towards Kit in a positive way, I conceive that I would be negatively influenced by someone who had an internet marketing strategy. I don’t even want to conceive most what I’d see towards someone who claimed to hit the best internet marketing strategy. So in conclusion, I see that the word strategy is modify and I also see that actual strategies are cool, but a marketing strategy to me reeks of exploitative intentions and to me that is meet not cool.

Best Advertising For Small Business

Tuesday, August 11th, 2009

Kurb Promotions in Auckland, New Zealand provides affordable, personal
and comprehensive promotion and marketing services.

Our prices are competitive, our service is honest and fair, and our
knowledge of marketing service and strategies both online and here in
Auckland and New Zealand is well established.

Contact: kurbpromo@gmail.com

Here’s what we offer:

Online Marketing

Online marketing services and marketing packages for small business,
entrepreneurs, talent, artists, entertainers, creative people and more

Auckland Printing

Youtube Marketing

Cheap Video Production

Graphic Design

Music Promotion

From New Zealand we offer a level of service with our digital business
that is high quality but not high price. A professional marketing
services company that is still cheap and affordable.

The best advertising, whether for a diminutive playing or large, is playing that works. The price a diminutive playing someone pays for playing would not be an issue if the outcome of the ad was known.

If a diminutive playing someone had a choice of paying $1000 a month for playing that brought in a guarantee of at least $2000 a month profit, or paying $500 a month for playing that brought in $750 worth of profit a month, there would be no hesitation. That savvy diminutive playing someone would gladly shell out $1000 apiece month for the advertising.

Small playing playing has no such guarantees however. It’s not like purchase a refrigerator that is guaranteed to ready the milk and eggs cold. $1000 of playing might bring $8000 of profit, or it might bring in zero. So, what’s a diminutive playing someone to do, especially if faced with a restricted budget?

The best answer is to ingest diminutive playing playing that exclusive charges the someone when and if it works. There are several structure of doing this.

The direct method is called pay per click. This Internet choice is available with numerous online merchant sites as well as hundreds of newspapers across the country and the globe. Simply put, a diminutive playing agrees to pay a specified amount to the publisher, or the merchant site, for apiece ad that entices a consumer to become to the diminutive playing site. The price paid is generally an amount that the diminutive playing someone has bid on. More and more newspapers are offering this choice as they struggle to maintain competitive online with eBay, Craigslist and other pure endeavor classified and marketplace sites.

Another choice for pay per click and inexpensive playing for a diminutive playing that wants to concentrate on topical customers is with regional publications or whatever of the larger metropolitan newspapers and groups that are introducing citizen media sites. These zoned products offer a much less expensive buy because the diminutive playing advertiser is purchase the topical community instead of the total metropolitan circulation of the metropolitan paper.

Companies such as YourHub, a product of the Denver Post and Rocky Mountain News, are licensing these citizen media sites to other newspapers in other areas and those welcome diminutive playing playing and discount the price. They also encourage citizen journalism. The diminutive playing someone can advance articles, photos and topical stories, though the essay will undoubtedly edit something too unabashedly self-serving. This is still a enthusiastic artefact for a topical entrepreneur to introduce himself or herself to the neighbors in a friendly, casual and soft delude way.